Posts Tagged: balanced mathematics

Tabor Rotation Training is Transformational!

The last two Tabor Rotation training sessions for the 2015-16 school year were full of excitement, enthusiasm, and receptivity. The days were amazingly positive, but what happened after the training was even more impressive. With just a few weeks left in the school year, participants went back to their classrooms and immediately began to use the strategies they learned.…

The Extreme Value of Teacher-Guided Math/Teacher Time

In a recent conversation, dynamic math instructional coach, Chrystena Talamantez, shared the overwhelmingly positive response her teachers had to additional support in guided, small-group work with students at the Teacher Time Station. Since having this station was the primary reason why I created the Tabor Rotation Framework, I asked Chrystena to share her personal testimony to the extreme value of Teacher-Guided Math Instruction/Teacher Time.…

How Can an Administrator Support Tabor Rotation?

A group of highly engaged 4th graders in math stations at Jane Long Elementary School “Nothing so conclusively proves a man’s ability to lead others as what he does from day to day to lead himself.”     -Thomas J. Watson, founder of IBM “A leader is a dealer in hope.”     -Napoleon Bonaparte Since I’m not an administrator, I posed this question to principal Lorrie Kloss who began her journey in Tabor Rotation in May, 2014 and has seen ASTOUNDING results, “How can an administrator support Tabor Rotation?” Here was her response.…

Encouraging Simultaneous Interaction

Positive Group Interaction at Hambrick Middle School   “If you have a candle, the light won’t glow any dimmer if I light yours off of mine.”     -Steven Tyler, Aerosmith A participant in a recent Tabor Rotation Institute asked me this question, “Why is simultaneous interaction so important?” Jeff Sapp writes about the transformational power of simultaneous interaction in at-risk schools in the Electronic Journal of Science Education, Number 30: Fall, 2006.…

Hands-On Expanded Form

  What is expanded form and how do we make the practice of expanded form hands on and engaging? Let’s start with the first question. Expanded Form is… …the writing of a number to show the value of each digit. …the sum of each digit multiplied by its place value.…

Homework???

After spending a day immersed in an initial training at a recent Tabor Rotation Institute, participants placed several sticky notes on the “parking lot” of questions. I promised I’d blog about those questions. “When do you give homework?” “When do you check homework?” “When you’re using math stations and guided readiness groups, how will you have enough time check homework?” These are valid questions, especially when a teacher or school is beginning to use small-group, differentiated instruction in math using the Tabor Rotation Framework and homework is mandatory.…

Why Learn Conversions???

  “The journey for an education starts with a childhood question.”     – David L. Finn As I played “Conversion Concentration” with a small group of students at the Games Station, one student asked the inevitable question about conversions, “Why do we have to learn this stuff?” These students had been completing a conversion chart every week since the beginning of school, but their teacher knew the value of partnering conversion memorization with meaning, so before the students began creating conversion charts, he had the students use manipulatives at the Manipulatives Station to help them develop a concrete understanding of the relationship between fractions, decimals, and percents.…

The Origin of Tabor Rotation

Like any good invention, the Tabor Rotation Framework came out of necessity. A couple of decades ago, I realized that my students needed a better way to learn mathematical concepts. I had almost 40 students in a class, a classroom with no walls, fewer than half of my students on grade level, less than 60 minutes to teach math, and my students would be taking MSPAP (Maryland School Performance Assessment Program).  The way I had always taught math wasn’t going to be effective for much longer.…