Posts Tagged: secondary math stations

Integers in Math Stations

Integer: a number with no fractional part; includes the counting numbers {1, 2, 3, …}, zero {0}, and the negative of the counting numbers {-1, -2, -3, …} The term integer is not typically used in a secondary student’s everyday life. There’s no shortened version for texting it.…

Getting Started with Algebra Math Stations

Are you an Algebra teacher who is wanting to begin using math stations, small groups, and guided instruction with your classes? If you are, then I’m already impressed and the students you have this year will be, too! Here are a few basic tips for implementing guided math instruction in a secondary classroom: 1.…

Guided Math via the Teacher Time Station

The most popular math station during a week of Tabor Rotation? In every survey, formal or informal, the answer is always Teacher Time. This is the guided math station, of the Tabor Rotation Framework, where teachers plan to teach a small group of  the most difficult concepts for the week.…

Why Learn Conversions???

  “The journey for an education starts with a childhood question.”     – David L. Finn As I played “Conversion Concentration” with a small group of students at the Games Station, one student asked the inevitable question about conversions, “Why do we have to learn this stuff?” These students had been completing a conversion chart every week since the beginning of school, but their teacher knew the value of partnering conversion memorization with meaning, so before the students began creating conversion charts, he had the students use manipulatives at the Manipulatives Station to help them develop a concrete understanding of the relationship between fractions, decimals, and percents.…

Geometry–Out of the Box!

I received an email this morning from a Geometry Instructor/Assistant Athletic Director who has been using the Tabor Rotation Framework at the Secondary Level for the past two years. Attached to it was a real-world assessment of the geometrical concept of transformations. I was engaged just by reading it!…

Objective Observation

“The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity.”     -Dorothy Parker One of the most powerful tools a teacher has available is objective observation. In a differentiated math classroom, especially one that makes use of math stations, observation is essential. I was reminded of this in a conversation with an administrator who had hired me to assist her school in the sophisticating the ways in which they instruct mathematics.…

Accountability in Small-Group Instruction

“How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment to improve the world.”     -Anne Frank Many secondary teachers are fine-tuning the use of small-group instruction in their classrooms. The email below is an incredible exchange with great information. Hope it helps some of you, too.…

More Tabor Rotation Trainer Tips

Yesterday’s blog gave the first half of tips and “aha” moments from participants in Tabor Rotation Training of Trainers Institutes. Here’s the second half. may they encourage you to try using small-group, differentiated instruction in your school. Tip #16: Every learner ‘s brain craves moving from the concrete to the pictorial to the abstract.…

Tabor Rotation Tips from Trainers

  The following tips and “aha” moments came from participants in Tabor Rotation Training of Trainers Institutes. They allowed me to share them with you in hopes that they might ignite your fire for sophisticating the use of guided math groups, math stations, and differentiated instruction in math using The Tabor Rotation Framework.…